IHS is Committed to Providing Quality Workforce Housing at a Fair Price

As fracking and oil exploration continues to grow throughout the United States, housing prices have inflated to rates that borderline lunacy.  The Associated Press recently published an article stating the average cost for a 700-sqaure-foot, one bedroom apartment in Williston, North Dakota is $2,394 per month.  On average, a comparable apartment in New York costs $1,504 and even the high priced Los Angeles area comes in at $1,411. Though fracking pay can range well in excess of $100,000, these high workforce housing rental costs are causing issue for companies, employees, and residents.   When landlords see the extreme rates others are charging for similar properties, they promptly increase the monthly rent on their homes and local residents are being displaced from their homes in cities throughout the US. Many families cannot sustain this high expenditure and are forced to relocate. While the rental properties are quickly filled with oilfield workers seeking workforce housing, the number of homelessness continue to rise. North Dakota saw an increase in homelessness by 200% last year alone.   Exploration, survey and fracking companies often pick up the bill for their employee’s housing while they are in the field. This can lead to extra monthly expenses well in excess of  $1,500 per employee. When the company does not offer housing to their employees, this creates a huge obstacle for the employee and can eliminate a significant amount of their earnings.   If you are looking for quality on-site workforce housing in Texas, New Mexico, Ohio or anywhere else in the county, Industrial Housing Solutions is here for you. We understand there is a high demand for workforce housing, but we also know everyone deserves a fair price. Whether you need to house five workers or several hundred, we can provide on-site workforce housing solutions to fit you...

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Remembering the Firefighters of Toledo Fire Department and the Brothers They Lost

As many of you have heard by now, Toledo Fire Department in Ohio tragically lost two brothers yesterday. While their community, families and department morns, we remember the sacrifice they made. Stephen Machcinksi, 42, was a veteran of more than 15 years and James Dickman, 31, was a rookie who had not yet completed the fire academy. Their mayday went out moments after officers decided to take a defensive position on the fire. RIT went into immediate action, found the two men and began life saving attempts upon exiting the still burning building. Sadly, both men were pronounced dead upon arrival at the hospital. This was the first line of duty death for Toledo since 1996 and the fifth and six LODD for the country this year. Though we did not know these men, we remember both as a special breed of people, heroes willing to run into harm’s way instead of away from it. Our hearts and prayers go out to the families, friends and fellow firefighters of Spehen Machcinski and James Dickman. To those brave men and women who sacrifice time away from their families and put other’s lives ahead of their own, we thank...

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6 Unique Fire Stations From Around The World

Whether in the United States, Europe or anywhere else in the world, fire stations are often built to resemble their surrounding structures. This can lead to stations with a very unique appearance and history.   1: Punta Cana International Airport Fire Station Located in the tropical destination of Punta Cana, you will have to look closely to find this unique fire station. Taking inspiration from the surrounding environment, the Punta Cana International Airport Fire Station is designed as a large tropical grass hut.   2: Lexington, KY Station #16 Nicknamed “The Cave,” Station #16 is located quite literally under a mound dirt and grass.  Though while most people believe the station was built into the side of a hill, it is actually a dome roofed concrete station that had dirt poured on top of it after construction. Reaching a thickness of up to 10 feet, the dirt insulation allows the building to be highly energy efficient and even remain a constant temperature if the building lost power. Lexington is a home for unique fire stations, as their Station #4 is believed to be haunted. 3: Orlando, FL, Reedy Creek Station #1 Known worldwide for Epcot and Disney World, Orlando is a major tourist destination in America. However, most people do not know that located behind Epcot is a cartoonish looking building. Painted with oversized red bricks on the bay and Dalmatian spots along the building, the Reedy Creek Emergency Services Headquarters fits right in with its Disney neighbors and is ready for action should their community call. 4: Houten, Netherlands Located in a problematic area of the city, Houten wanted to house their firefighters while also providing a unique fire station so the local youth would not vandalize it.  What resulted is the mixture of an industrial airplane hanger mixed with an art gallery. The glass bay creates a storefront feeling to display the apparatus while also creating a “climate buffer zone” allowing the living quarters to need less heating and cooling. The easwest direction of the building allows the solar panels located on the exterior to power the station year round. For an added touch, the main interior wall is blanketed in 2200 pictures drawn by the local school children. The pictures cross the range of the fire color panel starting with blue at the bottom and transitioning to red at the top. 5. Margreid, Italy Volunteer Fire Brigade While Lexington Station #16 was built under an artificial hill, the Margreid Volunteer Fire Brigade station is built into the side of a mounting. In an effort to conserver valuable agricultural space and determined to provide an energy efficient station, they began to dig into the rock wall. As the main entrance and engine bay are the only exterior facing walls, the interior of the station remains a steady temperature year round and requires little heating or cooling. The three caverns that make up the station comprise of engine bays, a main entrance, bunkrooms, meeting rooms, and office space. 6: Ponce, Puerto Rico “Parque de Bombas de Ponce” This building was built in 1882 as the main exhibit pavilion for the Exhibition Trade Fair and converted to one of the most unique fire stations we have seen in 1885. Though it is not in service today, it remained active for more than 100 years.  Built primarily out of wood and painting red and black, the building is now a museum honoring the city’s firemen.   Do you know of any unique fire stations? Whether it’s a station in your department or one you saw on vacation, we would love...

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5 Haunted Fire Stations to Stay Away from this Halloween

1: El Paso, TX Station #9 Around the Texas boarder city of El Paso, Station #9 is commonly referred to as “The Haunted Fire Station.”  According to the city website, “On February 13, 1934 the old American Furniture Co. warehouse that was located across the street from the fire station nearly burned to the ground. Captain Woodward Bloxom, along with two other firefighters, was caught in a flashover. He was pulled from the fire and rushed to the hospital but unfortunately he passed away the next day. Since then, firefighters who have worked at station 9 speak of strange things that happen in the station. One of the oddest is that usually right before a big fire in the area occurs, the firefighters are signaled that it is coming. Usually the bay door rolls up on its own or the lights will come on just before the alarm comes in from the dispatch center.”   2: Lexington, KY Station #4 In Lexington, Kentucky there is a station that rides with a picture of a skeleton’s head in a fire helmet on the side of their truck believing one of their crew from 1945 still rides with them. According to a story on the local news channel Lex18, a firefighter named Henry McDonald passed away in his sleep on Christmas Day 1945. Ever since, firefighters say objects are knocked off of shelves, they hear the disembodied sound of boots walking up the cast iron staircase, the engine turns on by itself, and chiefs have even gotten angry calls from locals claiming there was a firefighter standing in the upstairs window who wouldn’t come to the station door when they were knocking while the crew was out. Apparently the ghost of the fireman even got a promotion as he is now referred to as, “The Captain.”   3: Frankfort, IL Station #3             A station in Frankfort has gained so much notoriety for being haunted it even landed a spot on A&E’s television show, Paranormal Cops.  For years firefighters have claimed to see a shadowy blue figure walking the hallways of the station and engine bay. While A&E was filming they even captured audio of a voice singing and some of the crew even became sick during their investigation. (Maybe just bad beans cooked by the rookie.) They believe the ghost is Erwin Yunker, a man who died of a heart attack and owned a farm implement business on the same site of the fire station.   4: Long Beach, CA Station #12 Dubbed the “Ghost House,” Station #12 is supposedly haunted by John Makemson, a retired Long Beach firefighter who spent most of his career at Station #12.  According to the book, “Haunted Long Beach 2” the manifestations of Makemson have ranged from simple pranks to horrifying experience.  One member of the crew told the story that he could not find his jacked for days only to find it neatly folded and covered in dust on the bench in front of the shower he was in. Other stories have been a bit more menacing like the engine rocking back and forth with the doors opening and closing in the middle of the night. Some firefighters even claimed to have woken up to the sound of screaming and were unable to move as if a weight was pushing them down. Regardless of the Ghost House being haunted or not, Long Beach completed construction on new Station #12 and the crew moved in earlier this year.   5: Milwaukee, WI Engine House 35             While you may have thought the first 4...

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Thanking Our Heroes, Honoring the Fallen and Remembering 9/11

We Thank You Over the past several years, we have had the privilege of working with brave men and women in fire departments across the nation.  We are humbled by your courage in the face of danger, commitment to your fellow firefighters and relentless efforts to save lives and property. Everyday you kiss your loved ones goodbye and put your lives on the line for complete strangers. Not because it is the profitable thing to do, but because it is the right thing to do. In a time when quality role models are few, we thank you for your selflessness. We thank you for your ability to make the difficult decisions. We thank you placing your safety aside to save the lives of our brothers, our sisters, our mothers, our fathers, our families and our friends. We thank you for protecting our homes and our memories.  We thank you for being the heroes we need. A firefighter is a symbol of fierce bravery and overwhelming protection in times of despairing danger. When times are at their worst, you are at your best and we thank you.   Honoring the Fallen and Remembering 9/11 The World Trade Center On September 11, 2001 American Airlines Flight 11 crashed into the North Tower of the World Trade Center at 8:46 a.m. Fearing a great loss of life from this apparently tragic accident, first responders began arriving at the scene. Shortly after the initial crash, at 9:03, United Airlines Flight 175 was flown directly into the South Tower.  At this moment, the first responders and the world realized we were being attacked. With the World Trade Center’s infrastructure critically damaged, thousands of gallons of jet fuels filling the towers with a raging fire and hundreds of staircases ahead of them, the first responders made a decision. They put their lives behind the safety of others, they put their future memories with their families behind the safety of others, and they went in. For those of you who have never had the privilege to dawn bunker gear, carry a hose or physically exert yourself while wearing face mask in the heat of fire, the task these brave men and women accomplished will be hard to fully understand. Covered head to toe in thick fire resistant clothing, carrying hundreds of pounds of gear and breathing through an oxygen tank, they began to climb. The firefighters battled limited visibility, fires through out the building and frantic people desperately trying to escape. Whether by the few elevators working, or the monstrous stair climb, when firefighters reached the impact zone there was little they could do. But firefighters do not quit. They searched the wreckage and carried anyone they could find one hundred floors back to the ground. They radioed for back up saying they needed more help for fire suppression and they did not quit. Tragically, at 9:59 a.m. the South Tower collapsed instantly killing hundreds of civilians and first responders. Even in the midst of the impending collapse of their tower, firefighters relentlessly worked to save anyone they could in the North Tower. At 10:28 a.m. the North Tower’s structure could no longer withstand the heat of the inferno burning within and it collapsed, killing hundreds of more civilians and first responders. In total, 2,753 civilians and first responders perished at the World Trade Center on 9/11, of which 411 were rescue workers fighting to save the trapped victims inside the towers.   The Pentagon Unfortunately, the attack on the World Trade Center was not the only attack that day.  At 9:37 a.m. a group of...

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Temporary Housing for Firefighters Battling Wildfires

  As wildfires continue to rage in Idaho, a new fire has shut down parts of Yosemite National Park. The USDA Forest Service is reporting a total of 51 uncontained large fire and the national wildfire preparedness level has been raised to its highest level for the first time in years.  Current resources are being stretched to their limits as fighting these forest fires requires a massive logistical undertaking, including coordinating tankers, flight crews, government agencies and firefighters aiding in the efforts.  While the large number of volunteers is necessary, it creates a problem of trying to house so many in remote locations. Temporary housing for firefighters is an option that many departments beginning to take advantage of.   Short Term Lease Options Short-term leases of temporary housing for firefighters are allowing departments to get quality living conditions rapidly placed throughout the US as wildfires spread. Plus, at pricing usually lower than a hotel, they are a perfect solution to provide firefighters a place to relax after a grueling day without breaking the bank.   IHS Bunkhouse Trailers At Industrial Housing Solutions, our Bunkhouse Trailers were built specifically for these occasions. The 8’x49’ trailers can be pulled through nearly all terrain and allows a small enough footprint to be placed almost anywhere. However, don’t let the size fool you. These trailers are built with extra tall ceilings, can easily sleep 8 people in 4 bunkbeds, and include two bathrooms, a living area and a kitchen.  Built with high-grade insulation and durable materials, the trailer can withstand any climate or crew.   Reach out to a member of the Industrial Housing Team today at 866.704.1192.  Whether you need a Bunkhouse Trailer or a custom design, we can create a temporary housing rental solution for...

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